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Valentine’s Day。

Valentine’s Day

Finally the fourteenth day of the second month of the year is here. Valentine’s day.

Although the main purpose for observing this day has been ignored, people are unbothered and still make good use of the ‘unofficial worldwide holiday’.

Around the globe today, realities of life will be made clear to people. The love for a boyfriend or a girlfriend will go up a notch and ‘side chicks’ will know their rightful places- by the sides, after not receiving a text message from their supposed boyfriends.

It’s rather unfortunate that some people who have been enjoying a smooth and romantic relationship with their partners will find out how single they are today after their expected surprise romantic dinner turns into an unfulfilled dream.

And those who have agreed with their hearts to stay out of love will at a point in time regret that decision and wish the day will have only five hours instead of the normal 24hours after they see posts of their friends on social media having fun with their partners.

Social media. To make a long story short, there will be lots of lies on social media. Do not envy that girl who will post a picture of cupcakes on her WhatsApp status with the caption, ‘Can your bae ever?’ She probably ordered it with her own money and has no bae.

And to think of it, unwanted pregnancies will be lingering around and STI’s will be floating in the air, prevention is better than cure. Use protection, better still abstain!

Today is a day of love, show some love by starting with yourself, show yourself some love, pamper yourself, you owe no one an explanation for buying yourself whatever you will buy. It shouldn’t be a big deal if you do not receive any love just show love to others regardless.

Valentine’s Day shouldn’t even be a big deal after all, It is just an ordinary day in the month of love.

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Tune your mind, tune your life.

A venomous snake and a mouse lived in the compound of an old farmer and his family. One day, the snake went up to the mouse. “Do you know I can kill the farmer with just a bite?” He said boastfully. The mouse, not so surprised replied, “But he will not die because of that”. The snake was infuriated, “What do you mean? My venom is poisonous” The mouse calmly said, “We live to see” and they parted ways.

That evening, the snake went to where the farmer was resting in his compound. The mouse was looking. There was no light to detect the presence of the snake. The snake bit the farmer on his left foot, around his ankle. The snake quickly left. The farmer screamed for help. His wife hurriedly brought a lamp to look for the animal that bit her husband and probably kill it. The mouse, seeing everything that was going one, walked towards the farmer. The farmer’s wife saw the mouse. She was about hitting it with a stick when the mouse quickly ran into the bushes. The farmer’s wife treated her husband with a balm and they went to sleep.

The next evening, the mouse went and bit the farmer. This time on his right foot around his little toe. The farmer called for help. Before the farmer’s wife could get to her husband, the snake crawled to where the farmer was resting. The farmer’s wife upon seeing the snake, called the neighbors, they treated the farmer, but he died.

The farmer died because, in his mind the bite of a venomous snake was deadly.

The mind controls every action we take. If you tune your mind, your life will automatically take another turn. Tune your mind today and your life will be tuned as well.

COVID-19. CHAPTER 4

After three months break, here I am again! I promise to stay this time. I am on Instagram now @thedblog2020 Do well to follow. Cover image has been changed too, thanks to google.Today’s episode:

Dawger kay phase one

“Hello Kay”

“Hello good morning”

“Good morning…”

“How are you doing today?”

“I’m good”

“Okay…”

“I arrived yesterday…”

“But you didn’t call to tell me that”

“It’s not my fault o… I’ve been…”

“You couldn’t even send me a text message”

“You I’m sorry okay?”

“Mm… forgiven”

“Thank you boo”

“So, what’s up?”

“Everything is bad”

“How?”

“I think the government is not doing a good job in publication, which is creating ignorance among the people”

“You know you can take upon yourself to educate them on the virus? You know better”

“They will say I’m doing that because I want them to know I’m in the university”

“Funny”

“Yeah., I regret coming home, everywhere is boring”

“Hmm”

“You know I should have stayed in school or at your place?”

“Why?”

“Because… I love you”

“O really?”

“Yeah, why don’t you want me to be your quarantina?”

“Never said that… let me attend to something, I will call you later yeah?”

She knew ‘later’ meant when I remember but she went on and replied in the affirmative.

“Yes pl…”

He hung up even before she could finish saying yes please.

Donations?

“I’m going have a donation today and I need you and the kids to come along”

“I’ve explained to my kids that they are not going out in this period, I can’t go back to tell them to follow me for some donations I’m not interested in”

“My kids, my kids, my kids, like their yours alone”

“Okay”

“You make peace so impossible to achieve in this house”

“That’s your opinion, you are entitled to it by the way.”

He left and I continued with my workout. A few weeks ago, I would have struggled to choose specific answers for him, this time, I said the first things that came to mind and I was proudly unapologetic about how he felt.

“All you care about is your children, that is very bad, care about others.”

“What is the essence of this donation?”

“Do you even care about that?” He staggered

“I just want to confirm if you want to be noticed for your generosity or you truly want to help”

“You are just not a woman of peace”

“At least I’m not pretending to be generous so that is fine”

“I’m going with my kids. I’ll tell the media you are indisposed and that is why you couldn’t join me”

“I just hope my kids will follow you”

He went to speak to the kids and only Nhyira agreed to go with him. I didn’t have a problem with that. He went out alone. Nhyira wasn’t disappointed so obviously he spoke to her before leaving.

See you soon

COVID-19. CHAPTER 3

Bez

Before Sugar Daddy Kay, there was a bestie. They both know they are not only besties as they claim. They are more than that, sometimes the relationship between them is in between close friends and cousins. He is the only one on Legon campus who knows her intimately. He knows that she is from a family of about twenty-five. He knows that her mother is the first wife of her father’s four wives and numerous concubines. He knows that she is the third born of her mother’s four children but she isn’t aware of her position amongst her father’s plentiful children. He knows that her father does not spend a dime on her. And he also knows that she is in school due to the efforts of her uncles who thought she was too brilliant to be deprived of tertiary education. The day she told him she was moving to a single room hostel, he thought it was the generosity of a distant uncle who suddenly arrived from Europe whom she has never spoken of. And when she told him it was a friend who was paying for the rent, all the other questions followed. Do your uncles know? If your uncles don’t know why are you accepting his offer? Do your siblings know? Isn’t this what your elder sister did and ended up pregnant out of wedlock? Why does he want you to have privacy if he is just a friend? Is he married? Why doesn’t he want you to mention it to anyone? Don’t you think he will ask for sex in return? He was just worried that he was going to lose her to a rich man because he secretly had feelings for her although she was his occasional sex doll. Turns out he wasn’t going to lose her; his long list of needs and wants were yet to be met due to the kindness of Kay. There was a time Kay went to Dubai, he brought her three sneakers, only one was her size. She saved one for her brother and went to give one to Jude that it was a present from Kay. That is when it all started. He started making orders through her, “Tell Kay we are hungry”, “Tell Kay you want to go to the spa”, “Tell Kay you want a treadmill”. He got all his orders, yet he never saw Kay.

Initially, times without number, she considered backing out of the relationship but Jude was always there with his ‘he loves you a lot, you will crush him’ speeches. But she knew better. Apart from money and expensive gifts, there was nothing else he was doing for her. She couldn’t complain—he was married.

She knew it was a sin to be going out with a married man, she wasn’t happy when her father started having extra marital affairs and she didn’t wish it upon any other person yet here she was, destroying someone’s marriage.

Her conscience stopped pricking her the day Kay told her he was going to marry her after her degree. She was going to be a wife and a manageress after her first degree when her mates will probably be struggling to get 9-to-5 jobs. She felt better and way above their league. That is when she started being arrogant. She never mentioned to Jude that Kay was married. And she never mentioned to Kay that she has been sleeping with her bestie occasionally.

Social distancing preparations.

Since the day Kay and I started having our squabbles, I never found delight in staying at home with the kids. We will all be at home alright, but I did not want them to see me idle. Seeing me idle meant they could ask me questions, and that meant I had to formulate more lies. I did not want to paint their father black and I did not want to portray myself as the strong woman in the picture either. I simply did not want them involved and I did not want to give them clues as well. The president announcing social distancing and self-isolation scared me. No, I hadn’t come into contact with any covid-19 patient (Ghana had recorded less than 10 confirmed cases). My fear was staying at home with my kids. I was bound to eventually get bored staying at home with the kids alone and that meant more questions from the kids, more lies from me, and what I dreaded most; the Daddy-Kay-is-going-to-have-a-second-wife dialogue I had to have with each and everyone of them.

After staying up to listen to the president’s address to the nation, I did the first thing that came to mind—I made a list of all the items I was going to need for lockdown and even the ones I was never going to find useful. I was beginning my lockdown. Something the president did not mention.

First thing on Monday morning I went to the bank for a huge withdrawal. I explained to my kids why they wouldn’t be going to school, then I set off to the market. Knowing that Ghanaians were going to take advantage of the situation and inflate the prices, I went to the Madina market and did the first part of my shopping. I bought all the non-perishable goods on my shopping list, I literally emptied half of the shop. I arranged everything into my kitchenette using four hours and thirty-seven minutes.

The next day I went to the market for foodstuff shopping. It was market day at Adawso so I took advantage of that and drove forty-five minutes to Adawso with my kids for shopping. I filled the boot of my car before I drove back to Accra.

I did my stationary shopping which was my last shopping on the morning of the nextday. And I used the rest of the day to educate my kids on the virus and the precautionary measure. I bought a veronica bucket, boxes of acididc soap, a gallon of rubbing alcohol, and boxes of hand sanitizer from an online shop and I had it delivered that day. The next day was stews and soup making day. I stuffed my freezer with every kind of stew and soup.

I finally survived a whole week without telling any lie to my kids. On Sunday evening I told them my intentions to start homeschooling them. They were all excited about my plan and so I went ahead to read out the timetable to them. They were supposed to start learning from 8am to 10am, break for thirty minutes, take another two hours, break again for lunch at 12:30pm, resume at 1:30pm, and end at 3:30pm. I also explained to them they were not going to learn on Thursdays and Fridays. They were at liberty to use my sewing machine, their piano, their bicycles, their scooters and anything on those days.

Everything was perfect, for the first three days. While I’m teaching a child , the other two are doing self learning. We just did a recap of what they were learning in school before the ban on social distancing. Out of the blue their dad arrived on the evening of Wednesday.

Thank you for reading!

Stay safe!

See you soon!

COVID-19. Chapter2

Before COVID

The first time I met Kwame was my second year in the university as an undergraduate. I was at the Balme library, he walked up to me and asked me to keep an eye on his books and laptop while he steps out to attend to someone. Few minutes later he came back and asked that I take his phone number and call him in case he is keeping long and I wanted to leave. I finished my usual two hours study and he wasn’t back. Thirty minutes later and he wasn’t back, I dialed the number he had given me and he did not answer, after waiting for an hour and thirteen minutes he showed up all sweaty. He apologized for wasting my time, I brushed off the apology and advised him to keep his belongings with the assistant librarians the next time he is leaving. After that day, I saw him every other day at the library.

Three weeks later it was my turn to ask him for help. I left my laptop charger in my room and I needed a laptop charger to charge my laptop to enable me submit an assignment. He was glad to help. When I returned his charger, he requested to call me that evening, I thought it was only nice that I return his kind gesture and so I told him I was going to expect his call.

That night he called; we spoke for over three hours. His name was Kwame Boafo Adu-Apenteng, a postgraduate student at the business school and in his final year. He told me he didn’t have any friend on campus at that moment because his friends were either working or studying outside the country, and that was the reason he was almost always at the library. He told me he has been seeing me every day at the library and I told him it was my habit to visit the library every day for two hours. He sounded impressed. He never called again during the semester, we texted instead. Everyone calls him KB but he wanted only me to call him Kay. We became friends, then we became best friends with time, then we started dating.

After his second degree, he got a scholarship to do his PhD in the UK. I also got a scholarship to do my second degree in the States. We were constantly in touch. After his PhD, he moved down to Ghana and started job hunting, the salaries were not enough for a PhD holder, the job conditions were unsatisfactory, he didn’t seem to fit into the working class in Ghana. He started his own business, it was a water production and delivery service, it really had a slow growth but it was better than being idle at home. I was still his girlfriend. Three years into the water delivery service, he finally had a breakthrough, he supplied water for three thousand guests at a friend’s wedding ceremony and that was it. He received orders upon orders after that delivery. When he hit big, he asked me to marry him and I did. We had an average Ghanaian wedding; traditional wedding with family members supporting you, lots of SHS mates and friends cheering you on and the white wedding at the church. On the night of our wedding, he promised to work hard, enroll our children in a British curricula school, make sure I tour the world, make me very happy, and wed me again in a grand style. I believed him and told him I was going to pray for him and support him.

I wasn’t comfortable working as the head of communications for a television station but I couldn’t complain—there was a long list of unemployed graduates awaiting my resignation. But two months after our wedding, I got employed as a lecturer at the university of Ghana school of engineering sciences where I did my first degree.

When I had my first pregnancy, Kwame opened another branch of his water business outside Accra, and two other branches within Accra. He bought a house at East Legon. And he still had enough funds to pay his thirty-seven employers. One night when we were deciding on a name for our baby, he jokingly said he had been blessed with a lot of money because God has used his unborn baby to bring him a lot of money. And that was the inspiration for the name of our first child Maame Sika Frempoma Adu-Apenteng.

Two years after Sika’s birth, he started a poultry farm. Business was rather moving faster, he reared rabbits, grass cutters, pigs, and goats in addition. It was a blessing so we named the baby I had that year Naana Nhyira Aferwaa Adu-Apenteng.

Two years later when he opened a bank, the president closed down a number of banks and his wasn’t part, in his bid to thank The Lord, we named our first son and our third born Papa Aseda Afriyie Adu-Apenteng.

Everything was perfect afterwards. So perfect that the kids started calling me Mummy Kay because I used to call him Daddy Kay. And we enrolled all our kids in the British Virgin Islands Academy just like he had promised me on the night of our wedding. I could not spend twenty five percent of my salary in a month, he gave me monthly allowance, he instructed his workers to bring bags of sachet water and boxes of bottled water to the house every week, the products from the farm was also feeding us, all I did was to save my money, be a good wife and a good mother, and pray for him.

Aseda was barely three when he started noticing losses in the water business. After investigations, it was found that the manager was guilty of pilfering. He fired him like every CEO will do. The mangers for both the farm and bank starting pilfering too. He fired all of them and he doubled as a manager and CEO.

One night he asked if I could be helpful by volunteering to be a manageress in one of his companies. I told him I was a virtual manager. He asked how and I told him I am the one giving him ideas and he said that wasn’t enough. Two nights later he told me he wanted to have a second wife so that she could mange all his companies. I was pissed. He wasn’t joking at all. He started coming home late, he wouldn’t eat my food, he wouldn’t speak to me, he wouldn’t go to church with me, everything was a mess. But a messier situation was yet to be met. Sika’s bursar who happened to be my classmate from JHS called to tell me the kids were owing school fees. I honestly thought it was a mistake from their side of the school. Kay was in charge of school fees and he always paid before the beginning of the term. I called him to ask of the kids’ school fees receipt and he gave the cruelest answer ever. “How do you expect me to pay school fees of children whose mother does not want to sacrifice for my businesses. I’m never paying any of those pounds ever in my life. Have a nice day.” He hung up.    

I went to the bank, cash out part of my savings for the kids’ school fees and I went ahead to pay it. He stopped his workers from bringing us water and so I had to be buying water from other people for ‘his’ children and me. The eggs and meat also stopped coming so I had to resort to buying from the mall or cold stores. He moved out of the new house he bought for me and went back to stay in the apartment he bought at East Legon. Occasionally on weekends he will come and take the kids out—without my permission. I noticed that the kids were not performing well in school and so I sent him a text never to take kids whose school fees he wasn’t paying out without my permission. I never got a reply to that text, but he never came to see the kids. Not even on their birthdays and Christmas. I had to be telling lies to the kids about his whereabouts. I remember once I told the kids he was busy in Germany one morning and later that afternoon he was being interviewed live on tv. I quickly changed the channel but I’m very sure Sika noticed it was a live interview.

Beginning of this year, he showed up with bags of sachet water, eggs, meat, boxes of bottled water, and an amount of money in an envelope. I didn’t need all that. I told him I wasn’t going to take any of that and he didn’t attempt forcing me to take it. I told him to divorce me so that his next wife will have a white wedding since it was the dream of every woman. He left without a word. The next day he went to pay half of the kids’ school fees for the academic year, and he deposited ten thousand Ghana cedis into my account, I didn’t call to say thank you—he wasn’t going to answer my call.

It was the was the first day of her last internship. The first two she had had was very tiresome but it wasn’t worth the grade she was given. This time she wasn’t so much interested in the grade, she wanted to secure a place for her national service and if possible, a place to work after her national service. She was supposed to report at 8:00oclock but it was 6:30 and she was at the Okponglo bus top waiting for a trotro heading towards Shiashie where the bank was.

She was the first intern to arrive, the cleaner was impressed because she had volunteered to help him mop the floor. He used that opportunity to advise her to be a respectful and hardworking young lady, she had heard that several times from her mother and uncles but she had to listen again anyway.

After an hour and half of orientation, the secretary assigned all the interns to their posts. But before that, she told them the CEO was going to speak to them during their lunch break.

Her work was to sit at the front desk, write the names of whoever entered, assist anyone who needed help, smile at people who entered, do all the nice things with the exception of opening doors. She knew there was an additional task that was yet to be given; the early morning please-buy-me-hausa-koko, the midmornings go-and-buy-me-waakye, and the lunch break task of get-me-roasted-plantain-from-the-roadside. She wondered if that was what she was going do later with her degree in business administration.

From where she sat at the front desk, she could clearly see the streets. A man alighted from his vehicle and his wallet fell off. He headed in the direction of the ATM. She quickly left her post to pick up the wallet for the man.

“Sir please you dropped your wallet” she said panting

“thank you.” He opened the wallet to check if everything was intact. “Thank you very much, that was a helpful move” he beamed with smiles.

“You are welcome,” she replied shyly.

“Let me give you a tip for this gesture.”

“No sir, I’m okay.”

“O no let me do this”

“I’m okay sir” and she walked away to her post

The secretary came to call all the interns to CEO. That is where she saw that she just helped her CEO!

“Hey you” he said to her. “The name is?”

“Kate”

“Kate?”

“Kate Akrofi”

“Thank you for helping me” he unintentionally hit the envy-her button by that statement.

Fast forward eight weeks passed by and she finished with her internship. Her internship logbook was filled all the sweet remarks. She deserved it, she worked hard for it. But there was something else, she won the heart of the CEO. He took her number and started calling her after work every evening. It was through one of their conversations she told him she was named after her father’s mother who was called Kate and that was why her family calls her aunty Kate.When she was going back to her family for the vacation, he gave her money for transport.

When school reopened for her final year, he gave her money for provisions shopping, paid for a one-in-a-room hostel for her, on her birthday, he bought her an iPhone Xmax, and gave her money for a party with her friends. He told her to keep everything discrete and she agreed. He asked her to be his girlfriend and she agreed; she couldn’t turn down the proposal of a man who had turned into her father over a couple of months. He gave her a promise to make her his second wife so that she would manage his businesses. She kept that to herself.

When the first semester ended, she went home for the Christmas vacation. She acted all normal around her family until her brother noticed that she wasn’t using the Samsung galaxy pocket Wofa Yaw Badu bought for her when she first gained admission into the university. He confronted her about it and she simply said her friend bought it for her. He was happy that his sister has gotten a rich friend. Thankfully, Wofa Yaw never saw that phone during Christmas and that saved her from all the you-should-be-very-careful-of-the-people-you-receive-gifts-from speech was sure to receive after telling him a friend bought her an expensive gift of the sort.

School reopened and she went back to school, he kept on passing by afterwork. This month is five months of being in a relationship with him and they have never had sex before. The closest they have been to sex is an intimate hug and a peck from him.

Thank you for reading!

COVID-19. Chapter1

Writers block is the struggle of every writer including me. After ages of not being around, I am finally here👻! I’m not the type of writer who enjoys writing series—I’ll rather read someone’s. But see the wonders of corona virus! This is a series I’ll be uploading every week, do not ask me what it is about, the sweetness of the pudding is in the eating. Enjoy this series as you stay safe. I cherish comments. And please share. Google helped me with a cover picture😁

Day 12 Of Social Distancing- Welcome Home Daddy.

“Daddy Kay!” I heard Nhyira squeal outside where she was supposed to be having breaktime with her two siblings.

“Naana Nhyira!” he called back.

“Daddy Kay, finish parking and come and wash your hands or else you might bring the virus to the house.” that was Sika, my first born, noticeable for ensuring that her siblings abide by my rules.

“Yes, Maame Sika”

After he parked the car, her went to the veronica bucket I had placed outside to was his hands. I know he wouldn’t have done that if I had told him. Because his child told him, he is doing it.

“Daddy Kay, Mummy Kay said if you don’t use hand sanitizer you will get corona virus.” Nhyira said

“You liar! You only get corona virus if you come into contact with infected persons. The hand sanitizer is just to kill the virus, if there may be any on your hand and you are out of reach of running water and soap.” Sika corrected

“You are the liar” Nhyira fought back

“Let’s go and ask Mummy Kay.” Sika said heading for the hall where I was seated and going through the exercises I had given them in the afternoon.

“Breaktime is not over, stay outside” I shouted and I heard Aseda giggling.

He entered the hall and glanced in my direction, I avoided his glance, not because I was angry, I didn’t know how to react.

“Hi” he greeted

“Hi” I responded

He moved out of the hall. I didn’t bother following him. I didn’t care if he had brought foodstuffs or he brought money for shopping or he had brought part of the children’s school fees, I just didn’t care.

“Wash your hands and come inside, break time is over” I ordered

“Mummy Kay I love the cooling effect of the hand sanitizer” Nhyira told me as she blew air unto the back of her hands.

“Supper is ready, Sika will set the table, I’ll do the dishes with Nhyira, and Sika will keep an eye on Aseda while I do the dishes with Nhyira. Now get to work”

“Mummy Kay, is Daddy Kay going to eat with us?” Sika asked

“no please”

“Sure” she left for the kitchen disappointed.

Sika is seven years, but she knows what is going on. If not everything, she knows her dad and I are not at peace, she is trying not to take sides and I like it.

Nhyira is on her dad’s side, why wouldn’t she be? He has won her love with all the ice cream dates, pizza nights, and the kebab strolls.

As for Aseda, he is just three and strongly on my side. He is the one who hears the midnight arguments, he is the one who sees me crying at dawn, maybe the two others know and I don’t know they know, but he is the only child I know, who knows. He wouldn’t allow his dad touch him.

“Mummy Kay I want to eat in my room” Nhyira said, obviously not excited about eating without his dad

“Since when did you start eating in your room?”

“I want to try it today”

“No please. You won’t try it today. You’ll never try it.”

“Mummy Kay the stew is heavy.” Sika called from the kitchen and I left to her aid with Aseda close to my heel.

“Sika put this food cover in the laundry, it has oil stains.” I said after the prayer

“Mummy Kay I like small plantain, the very yellow ones.” Nhyira said

“Mummy Kay I also want lellow plantain.” Aseda said struggling to pronounce the word ‘yellow’

“Everyone is getting ripe plantain okay?” Sika informed

“Mummy Kay Aseda wants to use the knife.” Nhyira informed me

“Papa please you can’t use the knife now, when you grow a little then you use it okay?”

“Okay.” He said and dropped the knife

“Mummy Kay will we still be eating stale stews after the social distancing rumpus.” Nhyira asked

“No please”

“Mummy Kay didn’t you say we should never talk at the dining table?”

“I did”

“Mummy Kay then don’t entertain Nhyira’s questions” that was the law-abiding Sika

“She will”

“Everyone should keep quiet”

“We will Mummy Kay” Nhyira whispered

This Ghana Ebe Two.

“The government has really tried.”

“Stop saying the government has really tried like the previous government didn’t bring Ebola.”

“But people didn’t buy hand sanitizer like that.”

“I said yesterday, I brought two boxes, everything got finished. I was surprised.”

“This president is very good. He has the market women at heart.”

“4 more for Nana.”

Wait, so these market women think this is a ploy by the government to help market women?

Interesting!

Last week Sunday the vice chancellor announced that in order to practice social distancing, all lectures should be suspended until further notice. She was happy, more time for catching up at Kay’s place.

In the evening, the president addressed the nation, and confirmed the cancellation of lectures. She called him, very excited to tell him her plans of coming over in the morning, he didn’t sound enthusiastic about that but she didn’t care that much.

At dawn he called to tell her he was going to busy all throughout the week and he might not get enough time for her. She got the message—might not get enough time was destined to mean will not get time for her, loosely translated to mean she should not come at all. She stayed in her one in a room hostel which he had rented for her in her school, she got bored later in the day and went to see her bestie. They watched a couple of movies and ended up in a sleep over.

Wednesday came and through a communique from the vice chancellor, they were supposed to leave the school latest by Saturday 4pm. She called him to tell him about it. It was not a surprise to him; he had turned into her go-to-for-counsel cum sugar daddy in a space of five months. He promised to send her some money as transportation to her house. She wasn’t happy about that but how could she question a married man on his decision not to spend some time with his mistress and second wife to be? She brushed off the whys and thanked him for his benevolence.

Next morning, he sent her 200cedis but she didn’t leave campus that day, not the next day, not the day after, not the day the hall assistants came by sacking students. She left a week after. She managed to join the group of students who had peculiar issues and were going to stay in school. Someway somehow, her mother found out that were all supposed to come home and on Saturday morning she called her to find out why she hasn’t been at home.

“Auntie Kate, why is everyone in the mother’s house and you are still in the school?”

“Maa I’m doing my project work.”

“I’m sorry, do it for me my university lady.”

She was relieved that her mother had fallen for one of her lies. Her relief was cut short when one of her uncles called her on Wednesday.

“Auntie Kate why are you still in school?”

“Wofa Yaw Badu I’m doing my project work.”

“I heard the president when he said all academic activities be suspended. Don’t let me come and find the truth from your supposed project supervisor. Pick the next bus coming to Tinkong and come home.”

“Yes Wofa”

Her uncle was smart, he is the only person he couldn’t outwit. She knows he is aware that she has a sugar daddy, because her grades are always top notch, he has decided not to speak a word about it yet. He is also the only one whose orders she takes with all seriousness, that is why she had ordered an uber from campus in the early hours of the day to the station to come and board a trotro to Tinkong.

Kay wanted her to board the uber to Tinkong but she wanted to save part of the money for airtime. She made a mental note to tell him to buy her a MiFi after the corona virus brouhaha.

“Mate the car is full call your driver.”

She placed a pocket tissue on the window knob and open the window to allow fresh air.

“Some of you people behave as if you are more human than some of us”

One woman said after she used hand sanitizer for the sixth time in the trotro.

“This coronus viros is making me see that people are really too know in this car okay”

She didn’t utter a word.

“It is our sins that made God give us this covered nytin sickness” the driver chipped in

“Exactly what I was telling my husband this morning, the sins in the world is a lot. The gays, the armed robbers, disrespectful youth, o God is punishing us”

“But we Africans we are lucky to find the cure.” She nearly choked when she heard someone say that.

“Yes, I heard of garlic”

“It is garlic, ginger, pepper and salt grinded and mixed with akpeteshie, just be drinking it like blood tonic, morning and evening.

“I haven’t heard of that”

“It is a herbalist who taught me. It works ankasa

“Some even say weed” the mate contributed his quota, a glace at his lips and she did not doubt him.

“If you smoke you are safe.”

“You just have to stay away from frogs. You see the Chinese eat frog, that is whey they got the sickness first.”

When people in the capital are thinking of erudite measures to prevent the pandemic, people in another part of the same country are thinking of weird and outrageous measures like these ones. What happened to the wash your hands frequently gospel? And who even said corona virus is a punishment from The Lord? How can you even tell if it is from The Lord?

“Mate I’ll alight at Presby school junction.” She told the mate

When people are utterly observing social distancing in a part of Ghana, a group of people in another part of the same Ghana are seated under a mango tree playing cards. She shook her head as she alighted from the trotro and headed for her house.

“Auntie Kate o denden” her five-year-old niece called and she totally ignored her because she wouldn’t allow her stain her dress with snort.

“My university lady” her mother called from the wooden structure serving as the kitchen

“Came and give me a handshake, I have missed you.”

Ei Maa, they said we should not be doing that o, please, I want to be on the safe side.”

“Do I look like I have some of that sickness? you go and greet your uncle, he was here in the morning to ask of you”

“He’s gone to the farm” her younger brother said coming out from his room . “Auntie Kate you have a new iPhone?”

“Don’t shout, I’ll give the XR to you.”

“The same person who bought the XR bought the 11?”

“Yes”

“Then this man loves you”

“Stop saying it, Maa will tell Wofa Yaw Badu”

“Why are you washing your hands?”

“You haven’t heard of the pandemic?”

“It hasn’t reached the Eastern Region yet.”

“So, you are waiting for it to get here first?”

“Aane”

“This Ghana ankasa ebe two.” she shook her head

Thanks for reading. Catch you next week!

Happy Mother’s Day 🎊

Happy Mother’s Day to all mothers around the world! You make our world a better place, we can’t love you less.❤️❤️❤️

When I was a child, I was the opposite of my elder sister. My sister was calm, polite, neat, organised and everything expected of a girl. Me, on the other hand was rude, loud, disrespectful, unorganised, just the opposite of my sister.

My mother being a teacher, taught us after school everyday. My mother would take us through all we did in school during the day and go the extra mile to teach us some things above our level.

Because of the extra tuition my mother was giving us at home, I could write my name and the name of every member of my family in full as at age three. I could write essays that were meant for people about five years older than me.

But there was a thing about me. My sister was three years older than me and as such ahead of me in school. 90% of the teachers who taught my sister also taught me. They always told my parents on PTI Days ( Parent Teacher Interaction Day. Open Day in some schools) that I was smarter than my sister so they (my parents) should take good care of me.

Well, that got into my head and I started to misbehave. I didn’t do my homeworks, I didn’t write notes, all because I was ‘smart’. I started to perform poorly in school. I was getting critically low marks and I was gradually moving from an exceptionally good student to a below average student.

My parents tried all they could, from lashing me anytime I got bad grades to preventing me from watching television, but it couldn’t get me back to my position.

My dad ‘gave up’ on me. He refused to comment on my behaviour, he refused to lash me, he only prayed for me all the time. But I needed more than prayers.

My mom, she believed in me. I was in JHS three by then. She would wake me up at dawn to learn, inspect my notebooks, sign under my assignments to prove that she was there when I did the assignment, ensure that I spent less time watching television, buy me storybooks and made me write a summary of every book I read, give me composition topics to write on and ask that I submit it to her every Sunday evening, come to my school every Wednesday to inspect my school work. Initially the teachers were not happy about her weekly presence and they confronted her to reduce it but she did not pay heed to them. She was just bent on making me excel academically.

At the end of the day, she won. I passed my BECE with excellent grades and I got my first choice school.

In my whole life, God has been good to me. He gave me parents who are role models. But when He was making my mom, He certainly had me in mind. I cannot thank God enough! And anytime I count my blessings, I count my parents twice, but I count my mom more than twice!

For The Love Of Food.

Happy Easter! I pray the effect of The Cross will be felt greatly in the lives of everyone.

A big thank you to the new followers. I promise to make you stay.

And to the ‘low-key’ viewers, you are much appreciated.

Enjoy today’s case😁.

Has it ever occurred to you that the taste of food varies from one pot to the other? The same ingredients woman A uses to prepare a meal will produce a meal tasting different from the meal from the pot of woman B.

Sometimes I wonder what causes the difference in taste, whether it is the time the meal takes to cook, the size of the pot, the experience of the one preparing the meal or atmospheric conditions.

Honestly I cannot understand why ordinary boiled eggs with ground pepper should taste differently from the kosua ne mako* being sold in traffic. (Unless the road gives it a flavour).

Even homemade waakye*, will not taste like the waakye Hajia sells across the streets.

And the waakye from a five star restaurant tastes entirely different from Hajia’s waakye.

So what at all can be causing this variety of tastes?

I discussed this with a colleague and according to him, some meals taste better when cooked by a particular group of people.

Ga Kenkey prepared by a typical Ga woman is way nicer than any Ga Kenkey prepared by a ‘non-Ga’.

Similarly, waakye prepared by Hajia will not taste as Heavenly as Maame Fante’s* waakye. All I’m trying to say is that every tribe has a special meal that they can cook singlehandedly and it’ll taste supper good.

Hausa’s have a bachelors degree in preparing the best waakyes and no one can take that from them.

Maybe food vendors can prepare meals assigned to their ethnic groups better than any other meal which isn’t enjoyed by their ethnic group.

So the next time you want to grab a meal, make sure it is the vendor’s ethnic meal (if you really want to enjoy it). But before you do so, make sure the vendor is not an ‘insultant’.

You can share your thoughts in the comments section.😄

kosua ne mako*- Akan name for boiled egg and ground pepper.

waakye*- A meal prepared by cooking rice and beans.

Kenkey*- A meal prepared by cooking fermented corn.

Mama Fante*- A woman from the Central Region of Ghana.